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Yefim Alekseev
Yefim Alekseev

99 Bodyweight Exercises for a Massive Upper Body with Calisthenics: The 1 Chest, Arms, Shoulders and Back Program





# Calisthenics: Upper Body BLAST: 99 Bodyweight Exercises The 1 Chest, Arms, Shoulders & Back Bl


## Introduction


Calisthenics is a form of exercise that uses your own body weight to build strength and fitness. It includes exercises such as push-ups, squats, and lunges, all of which require no equipment. Some other exercises require bars at various heights, but there are usually other simple tools you can use, like tree branches, chairs, and tables. Calisthenics is great for upper body strength and fitness because it targets multiple muscle groups and joints with each exercise. You can work on your chest, arms, shoulders and back muscles with a variety of movements that challenge your balance, coordination and endurance. Some of the benefits of calisthenics for your upper body are: - Improved posture and alignment - Reduced risk of injury and pain - Enhanced mobility and flexibility - Increased muscle mass and tone - Boosted metabolism and fat burning - Higher confidence and self-esteem To do calisthenics safely and effectively, you need to follow some basic principles: - Warm up properly before each session - Start with easier exercises and progress gradually - Use proper form and technique - Breathe deeply and rhythmically - Rest adequately between sets and sessions - Listen to your body and avoid overtraining In this article, we'll show you 99 bodyweight exercises that you can do to blast your upper body with calisthenics. You'll learn how to do each exercise correctly, what muscles it works on, and how to modify it according to your level. You'll also get some tips on how to combine these exercises into a killer upper body workout that will make you look and feel amazing. Ready to get started? Let's go!


## The 99 Bodyweight Exercises for Upper Body BLAST


### Pull-ups


Pull-ups are one of the best calisthenics exercises for your upper body. They work on your lats, biceps, forearms, traps, rhomboids, deltoids, pecs and core muscles. They also improve your grip strength and shoulder stability. To do a pull-up, you need a bar that is high enough for you to hang from with your arms fully extended. You can use a pull-up bar, a tree branch, a door frame, or any other sturdy object that can support your weight. There are many variations of pull-ups that you can do to target different muscles and challenge yourself. Here are three of them:


#### Wide-grip pull-ups


This variation works more on your lats and outer back muscles. It also stretches your chest and shoulders. - Grip the bar with your hands wider than shoulder-width apart and facing away from you. - Pull yourself up until your chin is above the bar, keeping your elbows out to the sides. - Lower yourself down slowly until your arms are fully extended. - Repeat for as many reps as you can.


#### Chin-ups


This variation works more on your biceps and inner back muscles. It also engages your pecs and anterior deltoids. - Grip the bar with your hands close together and facing you. - Pull yourself up until your chin is above the bar, keeping your elbows close to your body. - Lower yourself down slowly until your arms are fully extended. - Repeat for as many reps as you can.


#### Military pull-ups


This variation works more on your traps and upper back muscles. It also activates your rear deltoids and rotator cuffs. - Grip the bar with one hand facing you and the other hand facing away from you, with your hands close together. - Pull yourself up and move your head to the side of the bar that is facing you, keeping your body straight. - Lower yourself down slowly until your arms are fully extended, then switch sides. - Repeat for as many reps as you can, alternating sides.


### Dips


Dips are another excellent calisthenics exercise for your upper body. They work on your triceps, chest, shoulders, and core muscles. They also improve your elbow and shoulder mobility. To do a dip, you need two parallel bars that are high enough for you to hang from with your arms fully extended. You can use dip bars, parallel bars, gymnastic rings, or any other sturdy objects that are at the same height and distance apart. There are also many variations of dips that you can do to target different muscles and challenge yourself. Here are three of them:


#### Regular dips


This variation works on your triceps, chest, and shoulders equally. It also strengthens your core stability. - Grip one bar with each hand and lift yourself up until your arms are fully extended and your legs are bent or straight in front of you. - Lower yourself down slowly until your elbows are at 90 degrees or lower, keeping your body upright and close to the bars. - Push yourself up until your arms are fully extended again. - Repeat for as many reps as you can.


#### Bench dips


This variation works more on your triceps and less on your chest and shoulders. It also requires less equipment and space. - Place a bench or a chair behind you and grip the edge with both hands, shoulder-width apart. - Extend your legs in front of you and lift yourself up until your arms are fully extended and your hips are off the bench or chair. - Lower yourself down slowly until your elbows are at 90 degrees or lower, keeping your body close to the bench or chair. - Push yourself up until your arms are fully extended again. - Repeat for as many reps as you can.


#### Ring dips


This variation works more on your chest and shoulders and less on your triceps. It also challenges your balance, coordination, and core stability. - Hang from two rings that are at shoulder height and grip them with both hands, palms facing each other. - Lift yourself up until your arms are fully extended and turn the rings outwards slightly, keeping your body straight and tight. - Lower yourself down slowly until your elbows are at 90 degrees or lower, keeping the rings close to your body. - Push yourself up until your arms are fully extended again and turn the rings inwards slightly. - Repeat for as many reps as you can.


### Push-ups



### Push-ups


Push-ups are one of the most common calisthenics exercises for your upper body. They work on your chest, triceps, shoulders, and core muscles. They also improve your posture and alignment. To do a push-up, you need a flat surface that is comfortable for your hands and feet. You can use a mat, a carpet, or a towel to cushion your palms and toes. There are also many variations of push-ups that you can do to target different muscles and challenge yourself. Here are three of them:


#### Standard push-ups


This variation works on your chest, triceps, and shoulders equally. It also strengthens your core stability. - Place your hands on the floor slightly wider than shoulder-width apart and extend your legs behind you, with your toes on the floor. - Keep your body straight and tight from head to toe, and look slightly ahead of you. - Lower yourself down slowly until your chest touches the floor or your elbows are at 90 degrees or lower, keeping your elbows close to your body. - Push yourself up until your arms are fully extended again. - Repeat for as many reps as you can.


#### Diamond push-ups


This variation works more on your triceps and less on your chest and shoulders. It also challenges your balance and coordination. - Place your hands on the floor close together and form a diamond shape with your index fingers and thumbs touching each other. - Extend your legs behind you, with your toes on the floor. - Keep your body straight and tight from head to toe, and look slightly ahead of you. - Lower yourself down slowly until your chest touches the floor or your elbows are at 90 degrees or lower, keeping your elbows close to your body. - Push yourself up until your arms are fully extended again. - Repeat for as many reps as you can.


#### Decline push-ups


This variation works more on your upper chest and shoulders and less on your lower chest and triceps. It also increases the difficulty and intensity of the exercise. - Place your hands on the floor slightly wider than shoulder-width apart and elevate your feet on a bench, a chair, a box, or any other sturdy object that is about 12 to 24 inches high. - Keep your body straight and tight from head to toe, and look slightly ahead of you. - Lower yourself down slowly until your chest touches the floor or your elbows are at 90 degrees or lower, keeping your elbows close to your body. - Push yourself up until your arms are fully extended again. - Repeat for as many reps as you can.


### Plank



### Plank


Plank is one of the best calisthenics exercises for your core. It works on your abs, obliques, lower back, glutes, quads, hamstrings, and calves. It also improves your posture and alignment. To do a plank, you need a flat surface that is comfortable for your forearms and toes. You can use a mat, a carpet, or a towel to cushion your elbows and feet. There are also many variations of planks that you can do to target different muscles and challenge yourself. Here are three of them:


#### Forearm plank


This variation is the most basic and common plank. It works on your entire core and stabilizes your spine. - Place your forearms on the floor and align your elbows under your shoulders. - Extend your legs behind you and rest your toes on the floor. - Keep your body straight and tight from head to toe, and look slightly ahead of you. - Hold this position for as long as you can while breathing normally.


#### Side plank


This variation works more on your obliques and lateral core muscles. It also strengthens your hips and shoulders. - Lie on your right side and place your right forearm on the floor under your shoulder. - Stack your left leg on top of your right leg and lift your hips off the floor until your body forms a straight line. - Place your left hand on your hip or extend it up to the ceiling. - Hold this position for as long as you can while breathing normally, then switch sides.


#### Plank up-downs


This variation adds some movement and intensity to the plank. It works on your core, arms, chest, and shoulders. - Start in a forearm plank position with your elbows under your shoulders. - Press your right hand into the floor and straighten your right arm, then do the same with your left hand and arm until you are in a straight-arm plank position. - Lower your right elbow to the floor and bend your right arm, then do the same with your left elbow and arm until you are back in a forearm plank position. - Repeat this movement for as many reps as you can while alternating sides.


### Handstand


Handstand is one of the most advanced calisthenics exercises for your upper body. It works on your shoulders, arms, wrists, core, and balance. It also prepares you for other handstand variations and skills. To do a handstand, you need a wall or a spotter to support you. You can also use a mat or a pillow to cushion your head in case you fall. There are also many variations of handstands that you can do to target different muscles and challenge yourself. Here are three of them:


#### Wall handstand


This variation is the easiest way to learn how to do a handstand. It helps you get used to being upside down and holding your body weight on your hands. - Place your hands on the floor about a foot away from a wall and shoulder-width apart. - Kick one leg up to the wall and then the other leg until both feet are resting on the wall. - Keep your arms straight and locked out, and press your palms firmly into the floor. - Keep your body straight and tight from head to toe, and look slightly ahead of you or between your hands. - Hold this position for as long as you can while breathing normally.


#### Pike handstand


This variation is a bit harder than the wall handstand. It requires more strength and flexibility in your shoulders and hamstrings. - Place a box or a bench behind you and place your hands on the floor shoulder-width apart in front of it. - Place both feet on top of the box or bench and lift your hips up until they are above your shoulders. - Keep your arms straight and locked out, and press your palms firmly into the floor. - Keep your legs straight and together, and point your toes up to the ceiling. - Hold this position for as long as you can while breathing normally.


#### Freestanding handstand


This variation is the hardest and most impressive handstand. It requires a lot of strength, balance, and control in your upper body and core. - Stand with your feet together and your arms by your sides. - Bend forward and place your hands on the floor shoulder-width apart, slightly in front of your head. - Kick one leg up and then the other leg until both legs are in the air and your body is vertical. - Keep your arms straight and locked out, and press your palms firmly into the floor. - Keep your body straight and tight from head to toe, and point your toes up to the ceiling. - Balance yourself by making small adjustments with your fingers, wrists, shoulders, and core. - Hold this position for as long as you can while breathing normally.


### Inverted row


Inverted row is one of the best calisthenics exercises for your back. It works on your lats, traps, rhomboids, biceps, forearms, and rear deltoids. It also improves your posture and scapular stability. To do an inverted row, you need a bar or a strap that is parallel to the floor and at a height that allows you to hang from it with your arms fully extended. You can use a pull-up bar, a TRX suspension trainer, a towel, or any other sturdy object that can support your weight. There are also many variations of inverted rows that you can do to target different muscles and challenge yourself. Here are three of them:


#### Horizontal inverted row


This variation is the most basic and common inverted row. It works on your entire back and arm muscles. - Grip the bar or strap with both hands slightly wider than shoulder-width apart and facing away from you. - Hang from the bar or strap with your arms fully extended and your body straight and parallel to the floor, with your heels on the floor and your toes pointing up. - Pull yourself up until your chest touches the bar or strap, keeping your elbows close to your body. - Lower yourself down slowly until your arms are fully extended again. - Repeat for as many reps as you can.


#### Elevated inverted row


This variation is a bit harder than the horizontal inverted row. It requires more strength and range of motion in your back and arm muscles. - Grip the bar or strap with both hands slightly wider than shoulder-width apart and facing away from you. - Hang from the bar or strap with your arms fully extended and your body straight and parallel to the floor, with your feet elevated on a box, a bench, a chair, or any other sturdy object that is about 12 to 24 inches high. - Pull yourself up until your chest touches the bar or strap, keeping your elbows close to your body. - Lower yourself down slowly until your arms are fully extended again. - Repeat for as many reps as you can.


#### Towel inverted row


This variation is a bit harder than the horizontal inverted row. It requires more grip strength and forearm endurance. - Wrap a towel around a pull-up bar or any other sturdy object that is parallel to the floor and at a height that allows you to hang from it with your arms fully extended. - Grip one end of the towel with each hand slightly wider than shoulder-width apart and facing away from you. - Hang from the towel with your arms fully extended and your body straight and parallel to the floor, with your heels on the floor and your toes pointing up. - Pull yourself up until your chest touches the towel, keeping your elbows close to your body. - Lower yourself down slowly until your arms are fully extended again. - Repeat for as many reps as you can.


### Muscle-up



### Muscle-up


Muscle-up is one of the most advanced calisthenics exercises for your upper body. It works on your lats, chest, triceps, shoulders, and core muscles. It also improves your power, coordination, and confidence. To do a muscle-up, you need a bar or a ring that is high enough for you to hang from with your arms fully extended. You can use a pull-up bar, a gymnastic ring, a tree branch, or any other sturdy object that can support your weight. There are also many variations of muscle-ups that you can do to target different muscles and challenge yourself. Here are three of them:


#### Bar muscle-up


This variation is the easiest way to learn how to do a muscle-up. It involves using a kipping motion to generate momentum and get your chest over the bar. - Grip the bar with both hands slightly wider than shoulder-width apart and facing away from you. - Hang from the bar with your arms fully extended and your legs slightly bent in front of you. - Swing your legs back and forth to create a kipping motion, then explosively pull yourself up towards the bar. - As your chest reaches the bar, lean forward and push your elbows down to transition into a dip position. - Press yourself up until your arms are fully extended and your hips are above the bar. - Lower yourself down slowly until your arms are fully extended again, then repeat.


#### Ring muscle-up


This variation is a bit harder than the bar muscle-up. It requires more strength and stability in your wrists and shoulders. - Hang from two rings that are at shoulder height and grip them with both hands, palms facing each other. - Keep your arms straight and locked out, and turn the rings outwards slightly. - Swing your legs back and forth to create a kipping motion, then explosively pull yourself up towards the rings. - As your chest reaches the rings, rotate your wrists and elbows to transition into a dip position. - Press yourself up until your arms are fully extended and turn the rings inwards slightly. - Lower yourself down slowly until your arms are fully extended again, then repeat.


#### Explosive muscle-up


This variation is the hardest and most impressive muscle-up. It involves using a lot of power and speed to get your body over the bar or ring without kipping. - Grip the bar or ring with both hands slightly wider than shoulder-width apart and facing away from you. - Hang from the bar or ring with your arms fully extended and your body straight and tight. - Pull yourself up as fast and high as you can until your chest is above the bar or ring. - As you reach the top of the pull-up, lean forward and push your elbows down to transition into a dip position. - Press yourself up until your arms are fully extended and your hips are above the bar or ring. -


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